Supersonic Man

August 27, 2017

Downsizing, into a larger home

Filed under: life — Supersonic Man @ 11:51 am

So it looks like we’re going to be moving soon from a house to an apartment.  And this is going to require some downsizing, and letting go of a significant number of physical possessions… even though the apartment has more square feet than the house did.

This is because in the apartment, everything has to be indoors.  This is not one of those complexes which offers people a storage closet down in the parking garage.  Imagine if all the stuff you keep out in the garage, in a shed, or just outside in the back yard had to come inside and fit in your closet space.  That’s what we’re facing.  Or rather, what I’m facing, as most of this junk is mine and not hers.  The only major bulky item that’s more for her than for me is a hammock frame.

There are some things we’ll be glad to get rid of, like our old clapped-out washer and dryer, and our window air conditioner.  We might get a few bucks for these.  Our little microwave too.  The patio table can go, along with the hammock, and maybe someone will pay a bit.

After that, I start realizing what I’ll have to give up… and it’s not that the stuff is very important or valuable, it’s that it represents capabilities and options.  If you have tools and junk, you can use handy-man skills to make things and accomplish stuff which are otherwise out of reach.  I value having the skills and inventiveness to make some good use out of tools and junk.  But the older I get, the less real use any of this comes to, and the less economic value this stuff is likely to hold for the future.  And that means there isn’t a good case to make for keeping this stuff around, competing for valuable closet space with all the stuff which is just as important in an apartment as in a house: the folding chairs and sewing machines and snowshoes and toolboxes and bicycle racks and ice chests and etc that have to be put somewhere.

So what I want to do in this post is just make myself a list of some of the stuff that I probably need to let go of, and have a little moment of sadness over the capabilities which I will be giving up, letting myself depend on the services of others in cases where I would formerly be able to do for myself.

One annoying thing is that we might live in a place with a yard again in the future, and at that time, we’ll want some of this back, and will have to buy it new.  But the cost of that is not enough to justify renting storage for years.

Some “garden” items might be able to hang on in our little porch/balcony… a stone Buddha, a colorful chicken-shaped flowerpot… and there’s a little handmade outdoor table we could keep… but probably won’t.

On to the list:

Long-handled gardening tools.  A shovel, two rakes, a hook, a “hula ho” weeder.  Some of those are quite worn, but the hook tool is almost new.

A big wide push-broom, and a telescoping paint-roller pole, which had uses well beyond painting.

An electric string-trimmer (weed eater).  Maybe the 75 feet of extension cord to power it.

Midsize gardening tools: loppers, shears, and a couple of one-handed digging/chopping tools, one with a telescoping handle.  It might be possible to store these away without taking up too much space, but they’ll have competition.

Lumber.  There isn’t very much of it, but it feels disempowering to have none.  Likewise for scraps of pipe and odd bits of plumbing supplies.

A shop-vacuum, and a couple of extra attachments.  It’s a very small one, but no less useful than a big one.

Jack stands and ramps, for getting under cars.  No more changing my own oil or brake pads.

A come-along winch.  Admittedly I got no real use out of this.  The same goes for the stationary bicycle stand I recently obtained, which is redundant as the new place has a gym.

An ugly plastic bird-bath, with gravel in the base for weight.  And a plastic flamingo if anyone wants it.

A 25′ drain snake.  This, unfortunately, has gotten some use.

A filtering water pump that has been used with a hot tub.

Assorted chemicals for outdoor or automotive purposes.  These will have to be culled.

Not an outdoor or garage item, but there’s a terrible battered old electric guitar that ought to go.  I have affection for it because it’s “so bad it’s good”.  Or wait, did I already get rid of that?

Then there’s the crappy telescope.  I can let that go if needed.

A pack frame.  I’m very unlikely to ever backpack again, and even hanging on to tents and sleeping bags may now be getting marginal as something we can justify.  And a barely used bear-canister.

A bookshelf, for paperbacks only, that I made from scratch out of cheap unstained pine.

Then there’s stuff which I definitely want to keep, but may require defending if someone hard-headedly practical challenges them… things like saws and hammers, old electronics supplies, a bass guitar, an ancient Amiga, LP records… I’ve already culled my books, and hope to hold the line there.

We’ll buy a few new things also, such as an upright vacuum and a small desk.  We might buy an easy chair, but only if we lose a couch.


[update] Arrgh, looks like it’s time to give up my big stereo and excellent Infinity speakers… if I can find a buyer for them. Shedding a small tear for the speakers.  Also the karaoke machine that we got for free and used only a couple of times.  There’s a glut of those, it turns out.  There’s some stereo equipment which I could keep but won’t, just because it’s not in good condition anymore: a turntable and a pair of nice bookshelf speakers.  Both have succumbed to a decay of their soft parts.

One couch is going.  The so-bad-it’s-good electric guitar appears to have disappeared in the previous move.  But on the other hand, we decided to play it safe and keep the drain snake.  Whee.

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August 25, 2017

ten percent of our brains

Filed under: Hobbyism and Nerdry,science!,thoughtful handwaving — Supersonic Man @ 9:40 am

If it were really true that we use only ten percent of our brains, then being granted the ability to use all one hundred percent wouldn’t really make a dramatic difference. It would be like comparing a desktop computer from 2017 with one from about 2005. Sure, the new one is better, but definitely not as much better as you’d hope it would be. They still both do basically the same things, and they’re both still probably hampered by running Windows.

I think there’s some metaphorical truth to the idea for a lot of people, though, because if they don’t get a good strong educational start, the majority of people don’t really have any chance of developing the intellectual side of their innate capabilities.  I’m pretty convinced that most of the differences we see between people in “intelligence” have nothing to do with one person being born with a better brain than another.  If you’re going to develop into a brainiac, you need to start very early and you need support for it, and most people around the world simply never get that opportunity.  It’s only when drawing comparisons between people who have had those advantages, and are already part of a privileged minority, that you can even start looking at innate differences in talent.

August 20, 2017

“Everyone is a little bit racist.”

Filed under: Rantation and Politicizing,thoughtful handwaving — Supersonic Man @ 3:19 pm

You may have heard that quote.  I am quoting it because I believe it’s true.  There is no dividing people into two groups, one racist and one not.  It’s a spectrum, and what matters is not what feelings or assumptions you start with, but what behavior you end with.  Let’s look at some sample points on this spectrum — some levels of racism:

Level 0: innocent.  This is where small children start out — unaware that race is a problem.  Maybe it’s possible to maintain this into adulthood in circumstances of major social isolation, but I don’t think I’ve ever personally seen an example of that.

Level 1: responsible.  We are all liable to sometimes forming snap judgments based on first impressions, and race is often a factor that plays into this.  But we can compensate for this by taking a moment for a second thought, to double-check our initial thoughtless reaction and make sure we’re being fair-minded.  This may not sound very impressive, but for most adults, this is about the best you can expect.  People in this category may be “allies” of minorities, or not.

Level 2: in denial.  This is probably where the majority of people fit, on most days.  This is where you land if you react to prejudicial snap judgments by rationalizing them instead of reconsidering.  Frequently accompanied by the idea that racism is largely historical, or confined to a few extremists — that it’s a distant external problem.  Racism at this level isn’t going to burn crosses, but it can produce frequent calls to the police about “suspicious” characters, or some extra strictness from the police themselves.  This mild racism can be enough to make a big difference in how difficult it is for some people to land a job or rent a place to live.  So even though the acts committed by any one individual seem minor and excusable, they can add up to a large negative impact on the lives of minority citizens.

Level 3: asshole.  This level is for people who sometimes show active racist behaviors, such as taunts and trolling and harrassment with racial epithets.  Generally these are people who are habitually unpleasant or obnoxious in other ways as well, or who have long lists of people whose lives they disapprove of.  Most often, such people are still in vigorous denial about racism, despite having numerous examples readily visible in the mirror.

Level 4: deplorable.  Finally, we come to those who have adopted racism as a guiding philosophy, and who actively evangelize it as an ideology: the Nazis, Klansmen, Neo-Confederates, and other racial separatists.  Many are fanatical True Believers, and as such, are capable of horrific violence for their cause.

Again, the point is not that people are divided into groups, who fit one label or another.  Any one person can and does slide up and down this scale, plus or minus a space over the course of a day, or larger shifts over months or years as they are exposed to different ideas.

And note that one’s position on this scale may have very little to do with the intensity or severity of their prejudices, particularly in the middle part of the scale.  Some can have major race-based fears and handle them well, and others might have minor ones but handle them badly.

The most important factor for affecting how a person moves forward or backward in their behavior is probably the social expectations of the people around them.

But don’t take this to mean that the way to make someone act better is by lecturing them.  If you really want to bring someone to see another point of view, it’s important to listen to them more than you talk to them, and let them express the feelings or anxieties or bad experiences they may be carrying on the subject.  And when you do speak, you want to be offering them an option, rather than making a demand.

Because when social pressure comes in a hostile form, it’ll probably have the opposite of the desired effect.  If you do listen to people at level 2 or 3 talk about race, one thing that often comes up is how much they dislike and resent hearing the word “racism” brought up as a belligerent finger-pointing accusation.

I don’t personally know who’s doing this kind of accusing, but some of my friends see it happen, and they affirm that yeah, it ain’t helping.  Maybe that behavior arises from having one foot in the responsible level and the other in the denial level, so you want to project and externalize the problem.  That’s just my guess, I can’t say.

As for the level 4 deplorables, I don’t think there’s much point in listening to them or engaging with them.  They’ve created a fantasy world where they believe each other’s made-up stories, so that’s all you’re likely to hear.  They’ve embraced evil, and there aren’t really very many of them, so socially, we can just write them off.

August 15, 2017

Nazi free speech

Filed under: Rantation and Politicizing — Supersonic Man @ 1:17 pm

The nazis among us like to complain that we’re stifling their right of free speech.  Here’s a reminder about some forms of speech which, by court precedent, are not and never have been protected by the First Amendment — types of speech which nobody has a right to make:

1. Fraud, false advertising, con artistry, and other forms of deceitful promise for personal gain.

2. Libel, slander, and defamation.  This includes not only attempts to damage reputations, but also taunts intended to provoke a violent response — “fighting words”.

3. Threats, intimidation, attempts to create panic (e.g. “fire!” in a crowded theater), or other means of trying to coerce people through fear.

4. Incitement of others to carry out violent or criminal acts.

5. Sedition — advocacy of overthrowing the government by force.

The courts may, for many of these categories, require strict or narrow conditions before ruling them to be unprotected and criminal forms of speech, but the point is that you do not have a right to deceive, a right to slander, a right to threaten, or a right to advocate violence.

If nazis and other racial supremacists think they have a right to advocate their point of view like the rest of us, well, let’s see if they can actually do so without committing any slander, making any threats, inciting any violence or insurrection, or making any fraudulent promises.  Since their actual program for society involves defaming large groups of people, using lots of violence and threats of violence, and overthrowing at least some parts of the Constitution, the only way they could advocate it without mentioning these would be by lying.

Nazi speech is sometimes suppressed, but if they think their rights of free speech are being violated, they’re wrong.  They never had any right to this form of speech.

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